Conservation and Restoration Ecology Major – Diploma – Vermilion campus

Welcome to the CARE galleries

class group in snowy foreground with Banff Park Lodge in distance

2nd year students attended the 8th Annual Alberta Institute of Agrology Conference in Banff, April 3-5, 2012. The theme was Water: What’s at Risk? Agriculture, Energy and Urban Use

See what our CARE students have been up to by clicking on the drop downs below.
View More ∇
View More ∇
View More ∇
View More ∇
Cataloging field lab View More ∇
Soil conservation poster presentation View More ∇
Students in environmental conservation and reclamation and conservation and restoration ecology presented their research in poster format to the college at large. Take a look at them and their posters below.

SC301 - Estimating Bankful Discharge View More ∇
SC301 Watersheds and Water Resources is a course taken by all Second year environmental science major students. One of the on the water labs is estimating bankful discharge.

These are the lab goals:
  • using surveying equipment
  • identifying the bankful stage
  • estimating the Manning n coefficient
  • collecting relevant field date used to calculate discharge using the Manning equation

SC301 - Estimating Stream Discharge View More ∇
  • Students estimated the discharge of the Battle River near Wainwright using the sectioning method.
  • They measured the total wetted width of the river, divided it into equal width sections and then measured the velocity and the depth at the center of each section. They then calculated the cross-sectional area of each individual section using the width and depth measurements they collected.
  • Next they multiplied the cross-sectional area by the velocity reading measured for that section to determine the discharge.
  • They then added the discharges calculated for each section up to determine the total discharge for this particular section of the Battle River.
View More ∇

Restoration Ecology presentation - Robyn Sayers - Naturescaping View More ∇
One of the requirements of second year is a presentation for SC 329 Restoration Ecology. Take a look at how Robyn Sayers promotes naturescaping, using native plants in landscaping. [View full screen by clicking the icon on the bottom right]

Note: These slides were designed to accompany an oral presentation and were submitted in partial fulfillment of course requirements for Restoration Ecology (SC329). This material was prepared for a general audience.

Restoration Ecology Presentation - Iraleigh Anderson - Working with Beavers View More ∇
One of the requirements of second year is a presentation for SC 329 Restoration Ecology. Take a look at Iraleigh Anderson's take on using the beaver, the "original wetland engineer" in ecosystem restoration. [View full screen by clicking the icon on the bottom right]

Note: These slides were designed to accompany an oral presentation and were submitted in partial fulfillment of course requirements for Restoration Ecology (SC329). This material was prepared for a general audience.

Restoration Ecology Presentation - Gerald Cousins - Pipeline Restoration View More ∇
One of the requirements of second year is a presentation for SC 329 Restoration Ecology. Take a look at Gerald Cousin's overview of pipelines and restoration. [View full screen by clicking the icon on the bottom right]

Note: These slides were designed to accompany an oral presentation and were submitted in partial fulfillment of course requirements for Restoration Ecology (SC329). This material was prepared for a general audience.


Field Trip to Jasper View More ∇
The 2011 Restoration Ecology Field Trip to Jasper National Park was a highlight for students. CARE students visited restored landscapes and wetlands. As an assignment, students created slideshows summarizing the trip.



BI210 - Forestry Measurement Techniques View More ∇
Second year students in conservation and reclamation (CARE) take BI210 Forest Ecology.

One of the labs is forest measurement techniques where they learn how to:
  • use a clinometer and digital range finder to find tree height
  • use a DBH tape to measure the diameter of the tree
  • use an increment borer to take a tree coring so they could age the tree
  • use a prism to estimate tree volume per hectare
  • complete an AVI code for the forest

These photos are from a field trip to Whitney Lakes Provincial Park March 12 -13, 2013

ZO245 - Candid Camera at Vermilion Provincial Park View More ∇
Candid camera aimed at a park's wildlife turned up interesting shots from wildlife in a snow storm to when another animal meets a skunk.

Students in Lakeland College's wildlife and fisheries conservation program and the conservation and restoration ecology (CARE) program set up four motion-activated remote cameras to record activity at various locations in Vermilion Provincial Park.

The cameras are weather resistant and take high resolution colour pictures during the day and infra-red photographs at night. The date, time and temperature are recorded on each image.
The project is a collaboration between Lakeland College’s School of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Alberta Tourism, Parks, Recreation and Culture. The two organizations are partners in numerous applied research and educational activities at Vermilion Provincial Park.

“There hasn’t been a lot of documentation on wildlife in the Vermilion Provincial Park,” says Darcey Shyry, an instructor in the wildlife and fisheries conservation program at the Vermilion campus. “Thanks to these cameras we borrowed from Alberta Tourism, Parks, Recreation and Culture, we are getting a glimpse of the activity of wildlife that inhabit or travel through the valley. We’re also estimating the frequency of human activity in some of the park areas commonly used by people.”

Unlike relying on humans to track wildlife numbers, the remote cameras don’t make any sound so wildlife activity won’t be deterred. In addition, the remote cameras provide more reliable identification of wildlife than tracking, as well as 24-hour monitoring. The cameras will occasionally be relocated by students to record activity in other areas of the park.

“The images will help us determine the type and abundance of wildlife in the park. Also, by moving the cameras to other locations, we can determine what animals are using specific regions of the park,” says Shyry.

Information from the images is summarized and reports are given to local and provincial employees with Alberta Tourism, Parks, Recreation and Culture. “Cameras are already in place in numerous parks throughout Alberta. This information will allow their staff to compare our results with data they’re collecting in other regions,” he says.

As for the students, the project is a perfect fit for their wildlife habitat conservation and wildlife ecology and management courses. During this academic year, students will complete detailed sampling to determine habitat in the areas surrounding the cameras. “This is just another example of how our students are able to live the learning at Lakeland College,” says Shyry.


Last updated on